Drug & Alcohol Counselling

Drug and alcohol use is extremely common; Lifetime rates of substance abuse/dependence have been estimated at over 30% for alcohol and over 10% for other drugs. Across a 12 month period approximately 8.5% of the population have an alcohol use disorder, and 2% have a drug use disorder. 1 2 Physical dependence is sometimes considered indicative of having a “problem” with drugs or alcohol. However, physical dependence is not required for your drug and alcohol use to be problematic. Drug and alcohol use can be physically harmful, even when one is not physically dependent. If it is negatively impacting on other aspects of your life (work, relationships/friendships, finances, psychological health etc.) it is also problematic and you may benefit from assistance in addressing it. Large-scale research studies suggest psychological counselling/ therapy is effective in treating drug and alcohol disorders 3 4, either with or without medication that can be prescribed for drug and alcohol problems. 5

Dr. Joanne Dennison and Dr. Tiffany Lewis have significant experience working with clients who experience issues as a result of their drug and/or alcohol use. Both Joanne and Tiffany draw on evidence-based treatments in delivering therapy. Tiffany specialises in working with adolescents with drug and alcohol issues, and Joanne specialises in working with adults with drug and alcohol issues.

Further to the above, the following blog posts may be of interest to you:

 

Notes:

  1. Compton WM, Thomas YF, Stinson FS, & Grant BF. (2007) Prevalence, correlates, disability, and comorbidity of DSM-IV drug abuse and dependence in the United States: Results from the national epidemiologic survey on alcohol and related conditions. Archives of General Psychiatry, 64: 566–576.
  2. Hasin DS, Stinson FS, Ogburn E, & Grant BF (2007). Prevalence, correlates, disability, and comorbidity of DSM-IV alcohol abuse and dependence in the United States: Results from the national epidemiologic survey on alcohol and related conditions. Archives of General Psychiatry, 4.:830–842.
  3. Magill M, & Ray LA. (2009). Cognitive-behavioral treatment with adult alcohol and illicit drug users: A meta-\analysis of randomized controlled trials. Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs. 70: 516–527.
  4. Woody, G.E. (2003). Research findings on psychotherapy of addictive disorders. The American Journal of Addictions, 12: S19-S26.
  5. McHugh, R.K., Hearon, B.A., & Otto, M.W. (2010). Cognitive-Behavioural Therapy for Substance Use Disorders. The Psychiatric Clinics of North America, 33: 511-525.